Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

enough, it is not likely there will be any delay in filling up the vacancy. So easy a Master as Mr. Wilkinson will not be found in a hurry. I have heard that it [sic] was a good deal annoyed at the mischievous pranks of the hoaxers--and no wonder.

The advertisement of the drowning was a great deal too bad. I had a pretty strong inkling that Master Bouske was at the bottom of it. You are doubtless inform'd of the death of the elder Mrs. Greenwood--a great relief, considering the helpless state in which she has existed for some years past, but it has brought before my mind the possibility, aye certainty indeed, of an event, which if I live to see it, will leave me in a manner alone in the world.

I am no news-monger, and am in a very stupid humour, and besides I am like to be in the situation where Adam was when his candle went out and for the same reason. I hope the Priestess of Lucina, (Mrs. Dodgin) will find Mrs. Isaac in a promising way, and that she will get well over her approaching trial. Had your house been in a less busy and agitating state I think I should have paid you a visit, as I might possibly have helped you in the school; but under existing circumstances I am afraid I should be in the way. Might I trouble you--at any opportunity--to send me a copy of the Verses on . . .1--which I do not possess in their corrected state?

Give my love . . .1 and a kiss to my little God-daughter. Remember me kindly to Mr. Upton and his family--are any of them likely to change their state?

How comes on the chapel? How is Mr. Wilkinson of Howgill?

Believe me--yours truly
H. COLERIDGE.


LETTER 64
To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, 10 Chester Place, Regent's

Park, London.

Sedbergh, May 25th, 1838.

Dear Mother

Your last but one arrived just as I was in the act of packing up: when I had literally not a moment for scrawling--yet I did take it to Rydal Mount and meant to have answered it, as soon as I was settled. But one thing or another intervened,

____________________
1
MS. erased.

-222-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.