Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

D. V., I would wish to appear in the current season. Were I informed on these points I might authorise my friends to take steps for the recovery of the copy-right of the first volume, which I believe is nearly out of print.

A speedy answer through the Colonial Office would much oblige,

Yours sincerely, though unknown, HARTLEY COLERIDGE.

P.S.--You will probably not deviate much from Gifford's text, which appears to me as good in most points, as is likely to be obtained. Should any consideration occur to me, I will take the liberty of submitting it to your judgement. Pray remember me kindly to Mr. Procter. I have not forgotten his kindness some nineteen years ago.


LETTER 68
To HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE, 10, Chester Place, Regent's Park, London.

Grasmere, October 24, 1839.

Dear Hal

Though in extreme haste to finish my job for Moxon, which is just on the nail, I must not let a post slip without answering your just-arrived--for with me in epistolatory responsion, a miss is as good as a mile--and dear Mother may be anxious. Her too literal interpretation has led her into a slight mistake; when I said 'you will see me soon', I only meant that my work would soon be out. I was somewhat startled at your first mention of the 'dim rumour' which I feared might have come from some misinformed busy-body in such a shape as to vex and alarm mother; for she is (I hope, not sick, but)

capable of fears Oppressed with wrongs, and therefore full of fears, A Widow, husbandless, subject to fears A woman naturally born to fears.

I had certainly no definite intention of coming to London at any prescribed time, though a great wish to see you all once more, and my little nephew and niece--whom I have never seen at all, nor can I call them distinctly before my mind's eye. Sara's and Ganny's elaborate descriptions of the Darlings, as such descriptions always do, bamboozle the esemplastic power. Young Derwent I seem to see in feature, hue,

-233-

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