Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

the 1st Vol--and also of the 'Worthies'. I think I could rely on Mr. Brancker's assistance--if needed. But of this and other matters, more in my next when I have set the last hand to Massinger and Ford, which will be about the week end.

It was a cutting phrase to say that I had deserted the Biographia; neglected would have been hard enough, but perhaps I deserve a cut. I will finish the Essay, if it be not too late. Poor Gillman! But by Mother's last was I inform'd of his death.1 Mother thinks she told me of it, but I cannot find it directly mentioned in any of her letters that have arrived, though I find allusions which I did not understand. I shall certainly write to Mrs. Gillman--I wish the letter may be a consolation, but letters of consolation in such cases are pure impertinence. I waive all mention of Derwent's Sermons,2 till I can read them with my whole heart and mind-- only I greatly approve of the form in which he has put them --as a succession of Essays--The pulpit of a country parish is no place for controversy, nor can any disputed point be fairly treated in the compass of a sermon. Glad to hear of his health and prosperity, but not very glad that his Mary has commenced a maternal career. She does not seem lucky therein, any more than dear Sara. There is some likelihood, the Dr. thinks, of Bertha. Hill is a good fellow. I would have gone to Rydal to make enquiries of the Hills, Wordsworths, etc., but it rains cruelly. What a year--Talking of rain, I would thank Snouter to send the mackintosh and stockings as soon as possible. I could hardly go to Keswick, should I be so disposed, when work done, without them.

Kindest loves to all, H.C.


LETTER 69
TO EDWARD MOXON.

Grasmere, March 12, 1840.

Dear Sir

My dear and honoured mother has informed me that you have transmitted to her your liberal remuneration for my introduction, for which I am truly grateful; it is considerably more than I expected.3 I regret that I did not adopt, in the

____________________
1
James Gillman's death occurred on June 1, 1839.
2
Cf. Derwent Coleridge The Scriptural Character of the English Church, considered in a series of sermons; with notes and illustrations, 1839.
3
Hartley in writing to his mother on March 13, 1840, says: 'It was always my intention to have left in your hands whatever Mr. Moxon paid, after

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