Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

air, but Mrs. W. cannot bear the thoughts of it, and the purpose is given up. Better accounts of Mrs. John. The Bard is wonderful, notwithstanding his rail-way afflictions, but Mrs. Wordsworth ages fast. What do you think of Mr. Ward--and the troubles at Helston?


LETTER87
To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.

My dear Mother

May 15, [1845.]

You rebuke my negligence more severely by complaining of it to my hostess than if you had told me of it in your few lines which, however, shall not be useless, if a few lines in return can be of any use. I ought certainly to have complied with your request to write soon, but I was not aware that the questions were of any pressing moment. However, I know how nervously anxious you are, and should give you no pain which any exertion of my own could spare. The Shirt by Miss Fenwick arrived safe. The silver fork is very acceptable. I am sorry there has been any trouble about Robinson's bill, but do not see that either Mrs. Richardson or I are to blame about it. The error must lie with Robinson's Bookkeeper, for the old man himself--a compound of Falstaff's Belly and Bardolf's Nose--is no Scholar. It will be righted in the course of the day, and you shall hear the result. I ought to look more closely to my own affairs and will do so in future. I do not exactly know how the bills come to be presented at different times within the Quarter, but you are probably aware that the Westmorland Tradesmen (Tailor, Shoemaker etc.) bring in their annual accounts at Candlemas, an inconvenient custom which there has been some talk of exchanging for two annual settlements. If I can hinder, Mrs. Wordsworth shall have [no] unnecessary trouble in future. She is very kind to take upon her a task of no easy nature. I will send you the verses on Dr. Arnold's death,1 and hope you will like them. I confess I succeeded better in pleasing myself than I can often do at present. I was thoroughly in earnest. Arnold was a man whose high merits in many ways none deny, but I confess I approve of much in his writings which some censure. Of his life there can be but one opinion. The Biography is admirably

____________________
1
Cf. Poems, 235-8.

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.