Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

With kind remembrances to Lady Coleridge, and good wishes of the Season to all your family.

I am, dear Sir, Your much obliged Poor Relation HARTLEY COLERIDGE.


LETTER 91
To MRS. HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE.

Nab. April 10th, 1847.

Dear Sara

This is not the long letter which I have been so long engaged upon, but it may serve to explain why that epistle is not forthcoming according to promise.

You have probably been informed that I deliver'd a lecture in the Museum of the Natural History Society of Kendal on the final Cause of Poetry,1 which went off pretty well on the whole, tho' some complained that it was too abstruse, and the term, final Cause, was objected to by a Scotch Doctor as pedantic and obsolete. However, I gave such satisfaction to as large an audience as a room pretty well cramm'd with cases of minerals and stuff'd animals could accommodate, as to be requested to give readings of the English Poets, with observations interspersed--which came off on the 8th and 9th ult. I am now engaged to continue those readings taking Dryden, Pope, and their followers and compeers for the subjects. (Compeers in fact they have none, and I believe that their indisputable pre-eminence in their own ways, for a time exalted them to a higher place among Poets in general than they actually deserved.) This is fixt for Monday 12th inst. When over, I will finish and despatch the pacquet which will respond to all your epistles, for I fear to say how long. As the funds of the Society are not very ample, I could not expect to be very largely remunerated. However, I have received £4. and been at no expense, being kindly convey'd, in the first instance with Mrs. Claude, in the 2nd in the carriage of Mrs. George Crawdson. A gig will be sent for me on Monday. I have been always entertain'd, and kindly entertained, at private houses. My last host is the son of John Gough, the famous blind naturalist and Mathematician--of whom ὴ1 μακατίτης (as I always designate our

____________________
1
Among Hartley's remains is a transcript of a lecture entitled 'On the Objects and Tendencies of Poetry'.

-288-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.