Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

has been awful for the last week. To day is bright, but I believe cold. I have not been out yet--but must be going--if this is to save post. I am you know 2 miles from Ambleside. There is a regular foot post to Grasmere who always brings the letters--and would carry them in the morning--if they were ready--but does not call as he goes, unless directed so to do--an alteration in the arrival of the mails gives time to answer letters same day. But the rail-road, which as yet stops at Birthwaite, some 6 miles from Ambleside, will open shortly--then the mails will be taken off, and a cart substituted. I know not how this will affect time. I hope the papers were right. I did expect--but I am a pretty fellow to be expecting--that I should have heard of their safe arrival. I sent them on the 7th. This is the 10th, and I'm too late for post after all. I enclose a sonnet written for friends only--and hope it will please you. Nurse's letter is too great a curiosity to be either burn'd or return'd.

With kind love to Edith and Herbert

I remain Dear Sara

Your affectionate Brother.

N.B. Tell Mr. Wordsworth there are hardly any Celandines out this year. He should write a sonnet about it. William Green has burn'd a hole in his breeches.


LETTER 92
TO THOMAS BLACKBURNE.

[ 1847.]

Dear Blackburne

Your reproof of my long silence was both witty and just. I have been long intending to write to you; but procrastination borrows of Time at Compound Interest and at last can only compound at about a farthing in the pound. Yet I was not frozen by your threatened Tee totalism (of which I should rather approve), nor am I quite so etherealized as to hang like a dew drop on one horn of the Moon--but--but--in fact, I delayed writing till I was uncertain whether my letter would reach you or not. I am sorry that you are going to leave your present situation. It seems to suit you well. I do not suppose aught I could say would alter your determination, but I cannot help thinking your scruple more scrupulous, or truth to say, more nervous than conscientious. Suppose your Pupil is not very quick at Latin. I was myself

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