Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

Briefly. Mr. Benson Harrison being absent, I applied to the Rev. F. Fleming, incum--not brance--what is it! of Rydal, who signified the fact of my existence in the flesh, but confessed that he had never given a certificate of the kind before, and was apprehensive of insufficiency or informality. I despatched said paper to Mr. Green, who inform'd me that it was informal and sent the proper printed forms, to be kept for a model for the future. I find that it is necessary I should certify the precise day when the annuity or rather the moiety thereof became due, and also the precise amount of the annuity, even to a shilling--neither of which I can do, without further information, which I must request you to send by the earliest opportunity, for I am ashamed to trouble Mr. Green, and expose my own forgetfulness. When furnish'd with the necessary knowledge I will get a regular certificate from Mr. H. who is now returned to Ambleside, and all will be well, as I am at present. I am writing a long letter, but shall not perhaps finish it this week for I've a heavy job on hand. Therefore, no more at present but love to Edith.

You know all that--but I must tell you that I saw Mr. and Mrs. W. at Chapel on Sunday, pretty well. Dr. Christopher Wordsworth preach'd ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Alas too.

[No signature.]


LETTER 96
TO EDWARD MOXON.

[ January 1, 1848.]

Dear Sir

It is not without some degree of shame and misgiving that I venture to address you, after so long an interruption of our correspondence,--meâ culpâ, meâ culpâ--as the Papists say; (à-propos de bottes, you are not, I presume the Bibliopole that has joined the Church of Rome,) and after leaving an incomplete work so long on your hands; I am somewhat emboldened, however, by your confidence, in trusting the introduction into my hands for revision.1 Our excellent friend, Mr. Robinson, shall have no trouble about it. With your leave I will omit some of that irrelevant matter, for which I was soundly castigated by Mr. Howitt's 'honest editor of the Atlas,' and supply the place with stuff more pertinent. I am

____________________
1
The second edition of Massinger and Ford appeared in 1848 with slight revisions.

-297-

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