Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

for a steady amendment, all that he has now lost might be regained. I confess, however, I dread the perverse ingenuity of his mind in self-justification

Will you be good enough in communicating this to my Uncle to say how truly I sympathise with him and Hartley in what they must both suffer in different ways--and that if any mode occurs to me or them in which I can be of service, I shall certainly gladly exert myself.

I am just starting for the Sessions and Circuit, a long campaign, which will keep me out from the 7th July to the end nearly of August--any letter after the 16th July will find me directed 'Western Circuit'. That I have not seen my Uncle for so long has not been my fault--we were absent in Devonshire for March and April, a few days only after my return it pleased God to bereave me of my child, and to visit my wife with a lingering illness--she is only now returning to health and tolerable spirits. We shall not be settled again till October.

Will you remember me very kindly to my Uncle, and Derwent, whom I should have been truly happy to have seen--and with my best compliments to Mrs. Gillman, believe me, very truly yours, J. T. COLERIDGE.


G

Letter from W. JAMES, Fellow of Oriel, July 15, 1820, to the REV. SAMUEL MENCE--Incumbent of Chapel at Highgate intimating that the decision of the Fellows arrived at in June was final and would merely be confirmed in October.

College Green, Worcester. July 15, [1820.]

My dear Mence,

As I am sure your own kind-heartedness will make you feel anxious on the very unpleasant subject of your letter, and what I have to communicate is of a painful nature, I send an immediate answer that I may not keep you in suspense.

There has not yet been any meeting of all the Fellows of my College to consider Hartley Coleridge's case--therefore I should not say that any Resolution has yet been formally made by the Society--but when we meet in October, the question will, in the ordinary course of things, come before us, and there cannot be the smallest doubt but that the Resolution expressed in your letter will then be made--though the decision of the College may be considered as already fixed (for there is but one opinion amongst all with whom I have communicated on the subject) it may not be without use to observe the distinction I have made above--for what we have yet done, will not be publicly known, which must be the case, if he is formally rejected by the Society: this he may

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