Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Hartley Coleridge; Grace Griggs Evelyn et al. | Go to book overview

a great defaulter. For having procrastinated the composition till I was unable to complete it in time, I dared not face the College with a fair confession of the fact, but absented myself, to the considerable inconvenience and disorder of the assembled fellows; and this offence being overlook'd, on condition, of a better performance, my production was not such, either as to quantity or quality, as to give satisfaction.

I cannot deny moreover that in two or three instances, I drank somewhat too freely, so as to be visibly disorder'd on my return home--but not so as to produce any deprivation, either mental or bodily, of the power of directing my own words, and actions: two of these instances occur'd at passing parties of my own Pupils; the other, which has been much dwelt upon, arose from my thinking (perhaps erroneously) that I was bound in civility not absolutely to refuse a stranger, who had just taken his Master's degree. As I was not previously acquainted with this man, who, it seems, had not acquired the favour of his superiors while an Undergraduate, my remaining with him, and drinking more certainly than was prudent, has been adduced to prove a love of liquor, and predilection for improper Society. I can only reply, and that with heartfelt confidence, that it was nothing but a fear of seeming inhospitable that prevented me from declining the introduction of more wine after the other fellows had left the Common-room, and that whatever I drank myself--was solely from compliance with what I conceived to be politeness; in fact, my offence was, the not having fortitude enough even tacitly to reprove another. As to my inviting him to dine with me next day, it arose from a mere compliment on my part, which he understood so, as to lay me almost under a necessity of paying him that attention. Of his character I knew nothing--this doubtless made my behaviour towards him imprudent, but I leave you to judge how far the above-mentioned inference from it was fair or candid. In no instance did I continue drinking after I felt myself sensibly affected, nor did any of the cases I have spoken of occur till after I had that conversation with Mr. Whately, in which I denied intemperance to have been the cause of late hours, or College irregularities.

[Letter breaks off thus.]


M
This fragment of a letter in SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE's handwriting, addressed to the WARDEN OF MERTON COLLEGE, was apparently drafted by Coleridge for Hartley's use in formulating the preceding letter.

[ December, 1820.]

. . . to put you in possession as fully as it is in my power to do, of the relation in which I stand at present to my Electors, and in

-320-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.