The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

the fire--those to G. Mathew I will suffer to meet the eye of Mr H. not withstanding that the Muse is so frequently mentioned. I here sinned in the face of Heaven even while rememb〈e〉ring what, I think, Horace says, "never presume to make a God appear but for an Action worthy of a God.1 From a few Words of yours when last I saw you, I have no doubt but that you have something in your Portfolio which I should by rights see--I will put you in Mind of it. Although the Borough is a beastly place in dirt, turnings and windings; yet No 8 Dean Street is not difficult to find; and if you would run the Gauntlet over London Bridge, take the first turning to the left and then the first to the right and moreover knock at my door which is nearly opposite a Meeting, you would do one a Charity which as St Paul saith is the father of all the Virtues--At all events let me hear from you soon--I say at all events not excepting the Gout in your fingers--

Your's Sincerely John Keats--


2. To GEORGE KEATS. Aug. 〈1816〉.

No address or postmark.

Margate Augt

My dear George,

If there be any room in this Sheet after I shall have

left, the first turning was Tooley Street, south of which, where London Bridge railway stations now stand, was a collection of small streets forming the district known as Berghené or Petty Burgundy. One of these running south was Dean Street, the southern end of it was a little east of Guy's.' Keats probably lived on the east side about the centre of the part not abolished by the railway. Dean Street is now known as Stainer Street; the change in name was ordered on the 16th of June 1906.

____________________
1
'Ars Poetica',191. Keats, who omitted the final quotes, had probably read the Earl of Roscommon's version:

'Never presume to make a God appear,
But for a Bus'ness worthy of a God.'

2
A corner of the holograph of this letter has been torn off and with it the precise date and possibly one or two words after 'prosing'. George Keats made a transcript of the poem in his scrap-book and dated it at the end 'Margate--August 1816'. The transcript follows the original very closely, but slight variations are found in the printed version in Keats's first book, Poems, 1817, where it appears as the second of three 'Epistles', the first being addressed to George Felton Mathew and the third to Charles Cowden Clarke.

-4-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of John Keats
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 566

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.