The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

Haydon and all his creation. I pray thee let me know when you go to Ollier's and where he resides--this I forgot to ask you--and tell me also when you will help me waste a sullen day--God 'ield you--1

J K


4. To CHARLES COWDEN CLARKE. 〈Nov. 1816.〉

No address or postmark.

To C. C. C. greeting

Whereas I have received a Note from that worthy Gentleman Mr Haydon, to the purport of his not being able to see us on this days Evening for that he hath an order for the Orchestra to see Timon ye Misantrophas, and begging us to excuse the same--it behooveth me to make this thing known to you for a manifest Reason.

So I rest your Hermit-- John Keats.


5. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. Wednesday 20 Nov. 〈1816〉.

No address or postmark. Nov 20th

My dear Sir-- Last Evening wrought me up, and I cannot forbear sending you the following--

Yours unfeignedly John Keats.--

____________________
1
Cf. 'Hamlet', IV. V. 42.
4
Amy Lowell, printing this note either from the original or from a transcript in the collection of the late Mr. F. Holland Day (see ' John Keats' , i. 202), believed it, although undated, to refer to the visit already planned on the 31st of October, because 'Timon of Athens' was on at Drury Lane for the ten days beginning on Monday, the 28th of October, and ending with the performance of Wednesday, the 6th of November.
5
Concerning the sonnet in this letter, Lord Houghton records that ' Haydon in his acknowledgement, suggested the omission of part of it; and also mentioned that he would forward it to Wordsworth'. The hiatus was not in the sonnet originally, the line being filled up with the words in a distant Mart; but in a second copy written by Keats to accompany Letter 6 those words are omitted and dashes are substituted. When this note was printed in the second volume of 'Benjamin Robert Haydon: Correspondence and Table Talk', the close was given thus:

'Yours imperfectly, John Keats.'

But unfeignedly is certainly the word.

Colvin, both in his "'Men of Letters'" Keats and in his edition of

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of John Keats
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 566

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.