The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

there all the next day--His Remembrances to you. (Ext from the common place Book of my Mind--Mem--Wednesday--Hampstead--call in Warner Street--a Sketch of Mr. Hunt〈)〉--I will ever consider you my sincere and affectionate friend--you will not doubt that I am your's--

God bless you--

John Keats--

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDONto KEATS. 3 March 1817.

No address or postmark.

3rd March 1817

My dear Keats,

Many thanks my dear fellow for your two noble sonnets1--I know not a finer image than the comparison of a Poet unable to express his high feelings to a sick eagle looking at the Sky!--when he must have remembered his former towerings amid the blaze of dazzling Sunbeams, in the pure expanse of glittering clouds!--now & then passing Angels on heavenly errands, lying at the will of the wind, with moveless wings; or pitching downward with a fiery rush, eager & intent on the objects of their seeking--You filled me with fury for an hour, and with admiration for ever

B R Haydon

I shall expect you & Clarke & Reynolds to night

My dear Keats,

I have really opened my letter to tell you how deeply I feel the high enthusiastic praise with which you have spoken of me in the first Sonnet--be assured you shall never repent it--the time shall come if God spare my life--when you will remember it with delight--

Once more God bless you

B R Haydon.


8. To JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS. Sunday 〈9 March 1817〉.

No address or postmark.

Sunday Evening

My dear Reynolds

Your kindness2 affects me so sensibly that I can merely

____________________
1
On the Elgin Marbles.
2
Mr. John M. Turnbull draws my attention to a review of Keats's first book which appeared in "'The Champion'" for 9 March 1817 and which he, after comparing it with Reynolds's protest against the 'Quarterly Review' attack on Keats published in 'The Alfred, West of England Journal and General Advertiser' for 6 October 1818,

-13-

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