The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

to money Matters as soon as possible--and I will to〈o〉-- so here goes. A Couple of Duns that I thought would be silent till the beginning, at least, of next Month (when I am certain to be on my legs for certain sure) have opened upon me with a cry most "untunable;" never did you hear such un "gallant chiding"1

Now you must know I am not desolate but have thank God 25 good Notes in my fob--but then you know I laid them by to write with and would stand at Bay a fortnight ere they should grab me. In a Month's time I must pay-- but it would relieve my Mind if I owed you instead of these Pelican duns.2

I am affraid you will say I have "wound about with circumstance"3 when I should have asked plainly. However as I said I am a little maidenish or so--and I feel my virginity come strong upon me--the while I request the loan of a and a --which if you would enclose to me I would acknowledge and save myself a hot forehead. I am sure you are confident in my responsibility--and in the sense 〈of〉 squareness that is always in me.

Your obliged friend
John Keats--


18. To JANE and MARIANE REYNOLDS. 〈Friday 5 Sept. 1817.〉

Address: Miss Reynolds, ∣ Mrs Earle's, ∣ Little Hampton, ∣ Sussex

Postmark: not recorded.

Oxf〈ord〉--

My dear friends,

You are I am glad to hear comfortable at Hampton, where I hope you will receive the Biscuits we ate the other night at Little Britain. I hope you found them good. There you are among sands, stones, Pebbles, Beeches, Cliffs, Rocks, Deeps, Shallows, weeds, ships Boats (at a distance) Carrots, Turnips, Sun, Moon, and Stars, and all

18. The original of this letter was sold at the John H. V. Arnold sale, Anderson Galleries, New York, in April 1904. When Keats wrote it to the sisters of his friend Reynolds, he was staying at Oxford with Bailey, who was supposed to have a tenderness for Mariane, and the young ladies were staying at Littlehampton.

____________________
1
'Midsummer-Night's Dream', IV. i. 121, 130.
2
Cf. 'King Lear', III. iv. 74.
3
Cf. 'Merchant of Venice', I. i. 155.

-35-

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