The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

me. I made a little mistake when just now I talked of being far inland: how can that be when Endymion and I are at the bottom of the Sea?1 Whence I hope to bring him in safety before you leave the Sea Side and if I can so contrive it you shall be greeted by him on the Sands and he shall tell you all his adventures: which having finished he shall thus proceed. "My dear Ladies, favorites of my gentle Mistress, how ever my friend Keats may have teazed and vexed you believe me he loves you not the less --for instance I am deep in his favor and yet he has been hawling me through the Earth and Sea with unrelenting Perseverence. I know for all this that he is mightily fond of me, by his contriving me all sorts of pleasures--nor is this the least fair Ladies--this one of meeting you on desert Shore and greeting you in his Name. He sends you moreover this little scroll"--

My dear Girls, (Remberances to little Britain)

I send you per favor of Endymion the assurance of my esteem of you and my utmost wishes for you〈r〉 Health and Pleasure--being ever--

Your affectionate Brother--
John Keats--

George and Tom are well--


22. To JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS. Sunday 〈21 Sept. 1817〉.

Address: Mr J. H. Reynolds. ∣ Little Britain ∣ Christs Hospital ∣ London.

Postmark: not recorded.

Oxford Sunday Morn

My dear Reynolds,

So you are determined to be my mortal foe--draw a Sword at me, and I will forgive--Put a Bullet in my Brain, and I will. shake it out as a dew-drop from the Lion's Mane2; --put me on a Gridiron and I will fry with great complancency--but, oh horror! to come upon me in the shape of a Dun! Send me bills! As I say to my Taylor send me Bills and I'll never employ you more--However, needs must when the devil drives: and for fear of "before and behind Mr Honeycomb"3 I'll proceed. I have not time

____________________
1
"'Endymion'", II. 1023--and Book III.
2
Cf. "'Troilus and Cressida'", III. iii. 225.
3
See Letter 21 and note 3 on p. 41.

-44-

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