The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

By the Whim King! I'll give you a Stanza, because it is not material in connection and when I wrote it I wanted you to--give your vote, pro or con.--

Crystalline Brother of the belt of Heaven,
Aquarius! to whom King Jove hath given
Two liquid pulse-streams! 'stead of feather'd wings--
Two fan-like fountains--thine illuminings
For Dian play:
Dissolve the frozen purity of air;
Let thy white shoulders silvery and bare,
Show cold through watery pinions: make more bright
The Star-Queen's Crescent on her marriage night:
Haste Haste away!1--

Now I hope I shall not fall off in the winding up, as the woman said to the 2--I mean up and down. I see there is an advertizement in the Chronicle to Poets--he is so overloaded with poems on the late Princess.3--I Suppose you do not lack--send me a few--lend me thy hand to laugh a little4--send me a little pullet sperm,5 a few finch eggs6--and remember me to each of our Card playing Club--When you die you will all be turned into Dice, and be put in pawn with the Devil--for Cards they crumple up7 like any King--I mean John in the stage play what pertains Prince Arthur.

I rest

Your affectionate friend
John Keats

Give my love to both houses8--hinc atque illinc.


31. To BENJAMIN BAILEY. Saturday 22 Nov. 1817.

Address: Mr B. Bailey ∣ Magdalen Hall ∣ Oxford--

Postmarks: LEATHERHEAD and 22 NO 1817.

My dear Bailey,

I will get over the first part of this (unsaid)9 Letter as soon as possible for it relates to the affair of poor Crips--

____________________
1
"'Endymion'", IV. 581-90.
2
Word illegible.
3
The Princess Charlotte died on 6 November 1817.
4
"'1 Henry IV", II. iv. 2.
5
Cf. "'Merry Wives of Windsor'", III. v. 32.
6
Cf. "'Troilus and Cressida'", v. i. 41.
7
Cf. "'King John'", v. vii. 31.
8
Cf. "'Romeo and Juliet'", III. i. 96, 112.
9
A mild play upon the lawyerly phrase 'this said letter' which would be Haydon's to Bailey: 'this unsaid letter' Keats's to Bailey.

-66-

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