The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

And yet the Evening listens. He who saddens
At thought of idleness cannot be idle,
And he's awake who thinks himself asleep.

Now I am sensible all this is a mere sophistication (however it may neighbour to any truths), to excuse my own indolence--so I will not deceive myself that Man should be equal with Jove--but think himself very well off as a sort of scullion-Mercury, or even a humble Bee. It is no matter whether I am right or wrong, either one way or another, if there is sufficient to lift a little time from your shoulders.

Your affectionate friend John Keats--


49. To HORACE SMITH. Thursday 19 Feb. 1818.

Address: Horace Smith Esqre ∣ Knightsbridge

Postmark: HAMPSTEAD; no date.

Hampstead Thursd: Morn.

My dear Sir,

My Brothers are expecting me every day in devonshire, and I have some days work before I can go thither: so I am hardy enough to nullify the day I had expected to pass with you, and trespassing enough to ask your indulgence therefore--

I am being greatly amused with your Poem1--it has a full leven of Wit and imaginative fun. I thank you for it now and will return it to Reynolds. Remember me to Shelley and Kingston.

Your's very sincerely John Keats


50. To GEORGE AND THOMAS KEATS. Saturday 21 Feb. 1818.

Address: Messrs. Keats Teignmouth Dover2

Postmark: not recorded.

Hampstead, Saturday.

My dear Brothers

I am extremely sorry to have given you so much uneasiness by not writing, however you know good news is no news or vice versâ. I do not like to write a short letter to

____________________
1
"'Nehemiah Muggs'." See letter 47, p. 101 and n. 1.
2
Probably a mistake of the transcriber, John Jeffrey.

-105-

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