The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

The thrushes are singing now as if they would speak to the winds, because their big brother Jack, the Spring, was not far off. I am reading Voltaire and Gibbon, although I wrote to Reynolds the other day to prove reading of no use; I have not seen Hunt since. I am a good deal with Dilke and Brown, we are very thick; they are very kind to me, they are well. I don't think I could stop in Hampstead but for their neighbourhood. I hear Hazlitt's lectures regularly, his last was on Gray, Collins, Young, &c., and he gave a very fine piece of discriminating Criticism on Swift, Voltaire, and Rabelais. I was very disappointed at his treatment of Chatterton. I generally meet with many I know there. Lord Byron's 4th Canto1 is expected out, and I heard somewhere, that Walter Scott has a new Poem in readiness. I am sorry that Wordsworth has left a bad impression where-ever he visited in town by his egotism, Vanity, and bigotry. Yet he is a great poet if not a philosopher. I have not yet read Shelley's Poem,2 I don't suppose you have it yet, at the Teignmouth libraries. These double letters must come rather heavy, I hope you have a moderate portion of cash, but don't fret at all, if you have not--Lord! I intend to play at Cut and run as well as Falstaff, that is to say, before he got so lusty.

I remain praying for your health my dear Brothers

Your affectionate Brother John--


51. To JOHN TAYLOR. Friday 27 Feb. 〈1818〉.

Address: John Faylor Esqre ∣ New bond Street No postmark.

Hampstead 27 Feby--

My dear Taylor,

Your alteration strikes me as being a great improvement --the page looks much better. And now I will attend to the Punctuations you speak of--the comma should be at soberly,3 and in the other passage the comma should follow

51. Keats began this letter by writing 'London F', which he struck out and wrote 'Hampstead' and the date above it. Perhaps he intended originally to write 'London Friday', the 27th of February being a Friday. He can hardly have written ' Faylor' in the address, nor 'natural natural too' in lines 14 and 15, p. 108, intentionally.

____________________
1
Cf. Letter 44, p. 97.
2
'The Revolt of Islam' (see note 3 to Letter 32, p. 72).
3
"'Endymion', i". 149.

-107-

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