The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

is quite low-spirited--It is impossible to live in a country which is continually under hatches--Who would live in the region of Mists, Game Laws, indemnity Bills &c. when there is such a place as Italy? It is said this England from its Clime produces a Spleen, able to engender the finest Sentiment--and cover the whole face of the Isle with Green--so it ought, I'm sure.--I should still like the Dedication simply as I said in my last.1

I wanted to send you a few songs written in your favorite Devon--it cannot be--Rain! Rain! Rain! I am going this morning to take a fac-simile of a Letter of Nelson's, very much to his honor--you will be greatly pleased when you see it--in about a week--What a spite it is, one cannot get out the little way I went yesterday I found a lane bank'd on each side with store of Primroses, while the earlier bushes are beginning to leaf.

I shall hear a good Account of you soon Your affectionate Friend John Keats.

My Love to all and remember me to Taylor.


62. To JOHN TAYLOR. Friday 24 April 1818.

Address: John Taylor Esqre ∣ Taylor & Hessey's ∣ Booksellers &c ∣ Fleet Street.

Postmarks: TEIGNMOUTH and 27 AP 1818.

Teignmouth Friday2.

My dear Taylor,

I think I did very wrong to leave you to all the trouble of Endymion--but I could not help it then--another time

____________________
1
Keats's insistence on this point may be in requisition some of these days. Dante Gabriel Rossetti was anxious to see the original Dedication substituted for the final and simpler one; and other critics of the future may have the same preference, which I am sure Rossetti would have been the last to push to execution had he noticed these passages on the subject.--H.B.F.
2
The 'Teignmouth' postmark on this letter has no date, but there is another postmark dated '27 Ap.' That date was a Monday; and a pencilled ' 27 April, 1818', evidently added by the recipient, chronicles the day of arrival. Woodhouse records that 'Endymion' was published in April; and it is clear from this holograph letter that Keats had examined the printed book at Teignmouth by the 24th of that month, and had managed to get the astounding blunder about Tellus feeling the load of her own forehead instead of Ocean's set right by the single- line erratum leaf printed as a portion of the earliest copies of the book.

-133-

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