The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

Minds to the service of the time being, whether it be in human Knowledge or Religion--I have often pitied a Tutor who has to hear "Nom: Musa"--so often dinn'd into his ears--I hope you may not have the same pain in this scribbling--I may have read these things before, but I never had even a thus dim perception of them; and moreover I like to say my lesson to one who will endure my tediousness for my own sake--After all there is certainly something real in the World--Moore's present to Hazlitt1 is real--I like that Moore, and am glad I saw him at the Theatre just before I left Town. Tom has spit a leetle blood this afternoon, and that is rather a damper--but I know--the truth is there is something real in the World. Your third Chamber of Life shall be a lucky and a gentle one--stored with the wine of love--and the Bread of Friendship. When you see George if he should not have received a letter from me tell him he will find one at home most likely--tell Bailey I hope soon to see him--Remember me to all. The leaves have been out here, for mony a day--I have written to George for the first stanzas of my Isabel-- I shall have them soon and will copy the whole out for you.

Your affectionate friend John Keats.


From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON to KEATS, Friday 8 May 1818.

No address or postmark.

8th of May 1818.

My dear Keats,

I have read your delicious Poem,2 with exquisite enjoyment, it is the most delightful thing of the time--you have taken up the great trumpet of nature and made it sound with a voice of your own--I write in a great hurry--You will realize all I wish or expect--Success attend you my glorious fellow-- & Believe me

ever & ever yours B R Haydon

____________________
1
Mr. P. P. Howe in 'The Life of William Hazlitt' ( 1922) says: 'We do not know what Moore's present to Hazlitt can have been, unless it was a copy of "The Fudge Family in Paris" which Moore sent at this time, and which as a tribute of respect from a fashionable poet to the leading spirit of "The Yellow Dwarf", was not unacceptable'. A copy of the third edition of 'The Fudge Family in Paris' ( 1818) inscribed 'To William Hazlitt Esqr, as a small mark of respect for his literary talents & political principles from the Author. April 27th, 1818'-- came into Mr. Howe's possession in October 1934.
2
'Endymion.'

-145-

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