The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

65. To Mrs JEFFREY. 〈May 1818.〉

Address: Mrs Jeffrey, ∣ Teignmouth.

No postmark.

Honiton.

My dear Mrs Jeffrey,

My Brother has borne his Journey thus far remarkably well. I am too sensible of your anxiety for us not to send this by the Chaise back for you. Give our goodbyes again to Marrian and Fanny. Beleive me we shall bear you in Mind and that I shall write soon.

Yours very truly, John Keats.


66. To BENJAMIN BAILEY. Thursday 21 to Monday 25 May 1818.

Address: Mr B. Bailey ∣ Magdalen Hall ∣ Oxford.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 25 my 1818.

My dear Bailey, Hampstead Thursday--

I should have answered your letter on the moment-- if I could have said yes to your invitation. What hinders me is insuperable; I will tell it at a little length. You know my Brother George has been out of employ for some time-- it has weighed very much upon him, and driven him to scheme and turn over things in his Mind--the result has been his resolution to emigrate to the back Settlements of America, become farmer and work with his own hands

65Up to 1891 Mrs. Jeffrey and her daughters remained unknown in the story of Keats. Between that time and the publication of my father's illustrated edition of the Letters in 1895, this letter and three others to the young ladies were discovered. Mr. A. Forbes Sieveking published them in 'The Fortnightly Review' for December 1893.

The date of this note cannot be fixed definitely from present information, but it must have been written after May the 3rd and some days before May the 7th, when Tom wrote from Hampstead to Miss Mary Ann Jeffrey: 'We received your Mothers Letter by Mrs Atkins which prevented my writing so soon as I had intended that the Letter might accompany the Book John promis'd you and be deliver'd by Mrs A on her return--I thank you all for your kind solicitude--the rest of the journey pass'd off pretty well after we had left Bridport in Dorsetshire--I was very ill there and lost much blood--we travell'd a hundred miles in the two last days--I found myself much better at the end of the journey than when I left Tartarus alias Teignmouth--' &c. On the 18th of May Tom added: 'John will write to you shortly', and the letter was posted on the 19th.

-146-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of John Keats
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 566

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.