The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

I am your debtor--I must ever remain so--nor do I wish to be clear of my rational debt--There is a comfort in throwing oneself on the charity of ones friends--'tis like the Albatros〈s〉 sleeping on its wings. I will be to you wine in the cellar and the more modestly or rather indolently I retire into the backward Bin, the more falerne will I be at the drinking. There is one thing I must mention. My Brother talks of sailing in a fortnight if so I will most probably be with you a week before I set out for Scotland. The middle of your first page should be sufficient to rouse me-- what I said is true and I have dreamt of your mention of it and my not a〈n〉swering it has weighed on me since. If I come, I will bring your Letter and hear more fully your Sentiments on one or two points. I will call about the Lectures at Taylor's and at Little Britain tomorrow-- Yesterday I dined with Hazlitt, Barnes,1 and Wilkie at Haydon's. The topic was the Duke of Wellington very amusingly pro and con'd. Reynolds has been getting much better; and Rice may begin to crow for he got a little so so at a Party of his and was none the worse for it the next morning. I hope I shall soon see you for we must have many new thoughts and feelings to analize, and to discover whether a little more knowledge has not made us more ignorant.

Your's affectionately John Keats--


67. To the Misses M. and S. JEFFREY, Thursday 4 June 〈1818〉.

Address: For Misses M. and S. Jeffrey

Postmark: not recorded.

Hampstead June 4th

My dear Girls,

I will not pretend to string a list of excuses together for not having written before--but must at once confess the indolence of my disposition which makes a letter more formidable to me than a Pilgrimage. I am a fool in delay for the idea of neglect is an everlasting Knapsack which even now I have scarce power to hoist off--by the bye talking of everlasting Knapsacks I intend to make my fortune by them in case of a War (which you must consequently pray for) for contracting with Government for

____________________
1
Thomas Barnes ( 1786- 1841), editor of 'The Times', 1817-41. He had been associated with Leigh Hunt and Hazlitt as a writer for 'The Examiner'.

-148-

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