The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

against Hunt calls me 'the amiable Mister Keats'1 and I have more than a Laurel from the Quarterly Reviewers for they have smothered me in 'Foliage'2 I want to read you my 'Pot of Basil' if you go to scotland I should much like to read it there to you among the Snows of next Winter. My Brothers' remembrances to you.

Your affectionate friend John Keats--


70. To JOHN TAYLOR. Sunday 21 June 1818.

Address: John Taylor Esqre ∣ Taylor and Hessey's ∣ Booksellers &c ∣ Fleet Street--

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 22 JU 1818.

Sunday evening

My dear Taylor,

I am sorry I have not had time to call and wish you health till my return. Really I have been hard run these three last days. However Au revoir! God keep us all well. --I start tomorrow morning. My Brother Tom will I am affraid be lonely--I can scarcely ask the loan of Books for him--since I still keep those you lent me a year ago--if I am overweening you will be I know will be indulgent. Therefore when he shall write do send him some you think will be most amusing--he will be careful in returning them. Let him have one of my Books bound. I am ashamed to catalogue these Messages there is but one more which ought to go for nothing as there is a Lady concerned I promised Mrs Reynolds one of my Books bound. As I cannot write in it let the opposite3 be pasted in prythee Remember me to Percy Street--Tell Hilton4 that one gratification on

____________________
1
In 'Letter from Z. to Leigh Hunt, King of the Cockneys', 'Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine', May 1818, p. 197: 'amiable but infatuated bardling, Mister John Keats' is the exact phrase.
2
Number 36 of 'The Quarterly Review', published in June 1818, contained a review of Leigh Hunt 'Foliage'. The 'other blow up' was one of the series of articles on the "'Cockney School'", which was appearing in 'Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine'. Keats is not expressly mentioned in the 'Quarterly' article; but there are covert references both to him and to Shelley--indicating that the shameful articles on "'Laon and Cythna'" and "'Endymion'" were probably already in contemplation.
3
Whether Taylor complied with this request so far as to send the book I do not know, but, if he did, he omitted to have 'the opposite' pasted in as it remains with the letter as given at the end.
4
William Hilton ( 1786-1839), historical painter.

-153-

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