The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

my return will be to find him engaged in a History Piece to his content--and Tell Dewint1 I shall become a disputant on the Landscape--bow for me very genteelly to Mrs D. or she will not admit your diploma. Remember me to Hessey saying I hope he'll Carey2--his point--I would not forget Woodhouse. Adieu

Your sincere friend John O' Grots

Mrs Reynolds with J. K's respects.


71. To THOMAS KEATS. Thursday 25-Saturday 27 June 1818.

Address and postmark: not recorded.

Here beginneth my journal, this Thursday, the 25th day of June, Anno Domini 1818. This morning we arose at 4, and set off in a Scotch mist; put up once under a tree, and in fine, have walked wet and dry to this place, called in the vulgar tongue Endmoor, 17 miles; we have not been incommoded by our knapsacks; they serve capitally, and we shall go on very well.

June 26--I merely put pro forma, for there is no such thing as time and space, which by the way came forcibly upon me on seeing for the first hour the Lake and Mountains of Winander--I cannot describe them--they surpass my expectation--beautiful water--shores and islands green to the marge--mountains all round up to the clouds. We set out from Endmoor this morning, breakfasted at Kendal

71. This letter was first printed, from a manuscript furnished by George Keats, in the June 1836 issue of 'The Western Messenger', a Louisville, Kentucky, magazine, edited by James Freeman Clarke. The same number contained the 'Ode to Apollo' ('God of the Golden Bow') printed from the original manuscript given to the Editor by George. In 1920 attention was drawn to the Keatsian interest of the magazine in the sale catalogue of Walter Thomas Wallace Library, New York. In 1924 Professor Ralph Leslie Rusk communicated the letter to 'The North American Review' for March, and he subsequently kindly furnished me with a photostat of the 'Western Messenger' print from which it is given here.

____________________
1
Peter De Wint ( 1784-1849), landscape painter.
2
The allusion is probably to some point connected with the publication of Cary's Dante for which an agreement had been signed by the translator and Taylor and Hessey at Coleridge's Highgate home on the 11th of May 1818. The Dante was advertised at the end of 'Endymion', and is referred to in the previous letter. See also Letter 79 and note 1, p. 194.

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