The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

as soon as possible and went on board the Smack from Cromarty. We had a nine days passage and were landed at London Bridge yesterday. I shall have a good deal to tell you about Scotland. I would begin here but I have a confounded tooth ache. Tom has not been getting better since I left London and for the last fortnight has been worse than ever--he has been getting a little better for these two or three days. I shall ask Mr Abbey to let me bring you to Hampstead. If Mr A should see this Letter tell him that he still must if he pleases forward the Post Bill to Perth as I have empowered my fellow traveller to receive it. I have a few scotch pebbles for you from the Island of Icolmkill-- I am affraid they are rather shabby--I did not go near the Mountain of Cairn Gorm. I do not know the Name of George's ship--the Name of the Port he has gone to is Philadelphia when〈c〉e he will travel to the Settlement across the Country--I will tell you all about this when I see you--The Title of my last Book is 'Endymion' you shall have one soon. I would not advise you to play on the Flageolet however I will get you one if you please. I will speak to Mr Abbey on what you say concerning school. I am sorry for your poor Canary. You shall have another volume of my first Book. My tooth Ache keeps on so that I cannot write with any pleasure--all I can say now is that you〈r〉 Letter is a very nice one without fault and that you will hear from or see in a few days if his throat will let him,

Your affectionate Brother
John.


84. To FANNY KEATS. Tuesday 25 August 1818.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Miss Tucker's ∣ Walthamstow

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 25 AU 1818.

Hampstead Tuesday

My dear Fanny,

I have just written to Mr Abbey to ask him to let you come and see poor Tom who has lately been much worse. He is better at present sends his Love to you and wishes much to see you--I hope he will shortly--I have not been able to come to Walthamstow on his account as well as a little Indisposition of my own. I have asked Mr A. to write me--if he does not mention any thing of it to you,

-213-

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