The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

I will tell you what reasons he has though I do not think he will make any objection. Write me what you what 〈for want〉 with a Flageolet and I will get one ready for you by the time you come.

Your affectionate Brother
John-----


85. To JANE REYNOLDS. Tuesday 1 September 1818.

Address: Miss Reynolds ∣ Little Britain--

Postmark: 1 SP 1818.

Well Walk Septr 1st.

My dear Jane,

Certainly your kind note would rather refresh than than trouble me, and so much the more would your coming if as you say, It could be done without agitating my Brother too much. Receive on your Hearth our deepest thanks for your Solicitude concerning us.

I am glad John is not hurt, but gone safe1 into Devonshire--I shall be in great expectation of his Letter--but the promise of it in so anxious and friendly a way I prize more than a hundred. I shall be in town to day on some business with my guardian2 'as was' with scarce a hope of being able to call on you. For these two last days Tom has been more cheerful; you shall hear again soon how he will be--

Remember us particularly to your Mother.

Your sincere friend John Keats-----


86. To CHARLES WENTWORTH DILKE. Monday 21 Sept. 1818.

Address: C. W. Dilke Esqre ∣ --Snook's Esqre ∣ Bedhampton ∣
near Havant--Hants.

Postmark: 21 SP 1818.

My dear Dilke,

According to the Wentworth place Bulletin you have left Brighton much improved: therefore now a few lines will be more of a pleasure than a bore. I have a few things

____________________
1
The word in the original might possibly be 'sane'; but it is more probably 'save', written in mistake for 'safe'.
2
Richard Abbey.

-214-

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