The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

half an hour before it set out and counted the buns and tarts in a Pastrycooks window and was just beginning with the Jellies. There was no one in the Coach who had a Mind to eat me like Mr Sham-deaf. I shall be punctual in enquiring about next Thursday--

Your affectionate Brother
John


89. To THOMAS RICHARDS. Friday 9 October 1818.

No address or postmark.

My dear Richards,

I think the fortnight has passed in which I promised to call on you--I have not been able to come--My Brother Tom gets weaker every day and I am not able to leave him for more than a few hours. As I know you will be anxious about us, if I cannot come I will send you now and then a note of this nature that you may see how we are. Reme〈m〉ber me to Mrs R-- and to Vincent.

Yours most sincerely
John Keats

90. To JAMES AUGUSTUS HESSEY. Friday 9 Oct. 1818.

Address: J. A. Hessey Esqr, Fleet St.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 9 OC 1818.

My dear Hessey,

You are very good in sending me the letter from the Chronicle1--and I am very bad in not acknowledging such

____________________
1
Two letters to the editor of 'The Morning Chronicle' printed in that paper on Saturday the 3rd and Thursday the 8th of October 1818.

'Sir, Although I am aware that literary squabbles are of too unin-

89
Although Keats did not date it and the second leaf which would have borne the postmark, if it went through the post, is missing, there need be no question about the date of this letter. It is written in the same bold hand as Letter 88 to Fanny Keats and on paper of a similar size. Moreover, it is endorsed, by the recipient I do not doubt, ' 1818. ∣ J Keats ∣ 9 Octr'. While it is more than probable that Keats wrote other letters to Richards, this is the only one that has come to light, and taken in conjunction with the fact that one of the Amena-Wells- Tom Keats fabrications was found with it in the archives of Thomas Richards's grandson, the Rev. John F. Richards, of Balliol, it is safe to conclude that Thomas, and not Charles, Richards, is the man who was the familiar friend of the poet.

-220-

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