The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

ness of my friends notwithstanding any temporery ambiguousness in their behaviour or their tongues; nothing of which how〈ev〉er I had the least scent of this morning. I say completely understand; for I am everlastingly getting my mind into such like painful trammels--and am even at this moment suffering under them in the case of a friend of ours. I will tell you--Two most unfortunate and paral〈1〉el slips--it seems downright preintention. A friend1 says to me ' Keats I shall go and see Severn this Week''Ah' says I 'You want him to take your Portrait' and again ' Keats' says a friend 'When will you come to town again' 'I will' says I 'let you have the Mss next week' In both these I appear'd to attribute and 〈for an〉 interested motive to each of my friends' questions--the first made him flush; the second made him look angry--And yet I am innocent--in both cases my Mind leapt over every interval to what I saw was per se a pleasant subject with him--You see I have no allowances to make--you see how far I am from supposing you could show me any neglect. I very much regret the long time I have been obliged to exile from you--for I have had one or two rather pleasant occasions to confer upon with you--What I have heard from George is favorable--I expect soon a Letter from the Settlement itself--

Your sincere friend
John Keats

I cannot give any good news of Tom--


97. To FANNY KEATS. Tuesday 1 Dec. 1818.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Miss Caley's School ∣ Walthamstow

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and DE 1 1818.

My dear Fanny, Tuesday Morn

Poor Tom2 has been so bad that I have delayed your visit hither--as it would be so painful to you both. I cannot say he is any better this morning--he is in a very dangerous state--I have scar〈c〉e any hopes of him. Keep up your spirits for me my dear Fanny--repose entirely in

Your affectionate Brother
John.

____________________
1
Ithink this friend--the two slips clearly belong to one occasion --was Reynolds. Severn painted an admirable miniature of him.
2
He died on the morning of December 1, and was buried in the church of St. Stephen, Coleman Street, on the 7th of December, 1818.

-244-

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