The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

From RICHARD WOODHOUSE to KEATS.1 Thursday 10 Dec. 1818.

Address: Jno. Keats Esqr

My dear Keats,

I have to thank you for a mark of kind consideration, shewn at a moment when an attention to such matters must have been peculiarly irksome. Accept this late acknowledgment of it.--Believe me, I deeply sympathised with you, though I could not bring myself to interrupt the sacredness of recent affliction with commonplaces of condolence.--Your brother is now, we trust, happier than we have ability to wish him--and it is our duty to turn eyes of gratitude around, for the many blessings that yet remain to us.--It will please me to hear that you are well and are recovering from the shock of your loss.

I send enclosed a letter; which when read, take the trouble to return to me--The History of its reaching me is this.--My Cousin Miss Frogley of Hounslow borrowed my copy of Endymion, for a specified Time--Before she had time to look into it, her and my friend, Mr. H. Neville, of Esher, who was House Surgeon to the late Princess Charlotte, insisted upon havg. it to read for a day or 2 & undertook to make my cousin's peace with me on a/c of Extra delay--Neville told me that one of the Misses Porter (of romance celebrity) had seen it on his table, dipped into it, & expressed a wish to read it.--I desired he wd. keep it as long, and lend it to as many as he pleased--provided it was not allowed to slumber on any one's shelf. I learned subsequently from Miss F. 〈that these〉 ladies had requested of Neville, if he was acquainted with the author, that they might have the pleasure of an Introduction.--About a week back, the enclosed was transmd. by Mr Neville to my cousin, as a species of apology for keeping her so long without the Book--and she sent it to me, knowing it would give me pleasure.--I forward it to you for somewhat the same reason, but principally because it gives me the opportunity of naming to you (which it wd. have been fruitless to do before) the opening there is for an introduction to a class of society from which you may possibly derive advantage as well as gratifn, if you think proper to avail yourself of it.--In such case I should be very happy to further your wishes. --But do just as you please--if you decline the overture rely upon it no intimation from (me) will ever reach the quarter in question, that the Lr enclosed or any thing that has transpired has come to yr ears. The whole is entirely at present "inter nos". I go out of Town tomorrow for 3 or 4 days. Do not therefore write to me till aft Tuesday next.

Believe me my Dr Keats
most sincerely Yrs
Richd Woodhouse.
Temple 10 Decr 1818.

P.S. I bele you are not at Hampstead--I shall 〈therefore?〉 beg Taylor to forward you this.

____________________
1
Printed from Woodhouse's draft in the Pierpont Morgan Library by courtesy of the Director. Keats quotes a portion of this letter in the following letter to George and Georgiana; see pp. 250-1. For Keats's reply, see Letter 100.

-245-

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