The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

101. To Mrs REYNOLDS. Tuesday 〈15 or 22〉 Dec. 1818.

Address: Mrs Reynolds ∣ Little Britain ∣ Christ's Hospital.

Imperfect postmark: DE 1818.

Wentworth Place Tuesd.

My dear Mrs Reynolds,

When I left you yesterday, 'twas with the conviction that you thought I had received no previous invitation for Christmas day: the truth is I had, and had accepted it under the conviction that I should be in Hampshire at the time: else believe me I should not have done so, but kept in Mind my old friends. I will not speak of the proportion of pleasure I may receive at different Houses-- that never enters my head--you may take for a truth that I would have given up even what I did see to be a greater pleasure, for the sake of old acquaintanceship--time is nothing--two years are as long as twenty.

Yours faithfully

John Keats


102. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. Tuesday 22 Dec. 1818.

Address: B. R. Haydon. ∣ Lisson Grove North ∣ Paddington

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and DE 23 1818

Tuesday Wentworth Place--

My dear Haydon,

Upon my Soul I never felt your going out of the room at all--and believe me I never rhodomontade any where but in your Company--my general Life in Society is silence. I feel in myself all the vices of a Poet, irritability, love of effect and admiration--and influenced by such devils I may at times say more rediculous things than I am aware of--but I will put a stop to that in a manner I have long resolved upon--I will buy a gold ring and put it on my finger--and from that time a Man of superior head shall never have occasion to pity me, or one of inferior Nunskull to chuckle at me--I am certainly more for great-

101. Miss Charlotte Reynolds told me that this letter was sent to her mother a few days before Christmas-day 1818. The choice is therefore between Tuesday the 15th of December and Tuesday the 22nd of December; and the later date seems the likelier. Miss Reynolds thought that the other invitation was from Mrs. Brawne.-- H.B.F.--This is confirmed in a letter of Fanny Brawne's.

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