The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON to KEATS. Wednesday 10 March 1819.

Address: Not recorded.

Imperfect postmark: 1819.

10th March.

My dear Keats,

I have been long, long convinced of the paltry subterfuges of conversation to weaken the effect of unwelcome truth, and have left company where truth is never found; of this be assured, effect and effect only, self-consequence and dictatorial controul, are what those love who shine in conversation, at the expense of truth, principle, and every thing else which interferes with their appetite for dominion-- temporary dominion. I am most happy you approve of my last Sunday's defence, I hope you will like next equally well. My dear Keats--now I feel the want of your promised assistance--as soon as it is convenient it would indeed be a great, the greatest of blessings. I shall come and see you as soon as this contest is clear of my hands. I cannot before, every moment is so precious.--Take care of your throat, and believe me my dear fellow truly and affectionately your Friend--

B. R. Haydon.

At any rate finish your present great intention of a poem--it is as fine a subject as can be--Once more adieu.--Before the 20th if you could help me it would be nectar and manna and all the blessings of gratified thirst.


116. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 13 March 1819.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey's Esqre ∣ Walthamstow--

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and MR 13.

Wentworth Place March 13th

My dear Fanny,

I have been employed lately in writing to George--I do not send him very short letters--but keep on day after day. There were some young Men I think I told you of who were going to the Settlement: they have changed their minds, and I am disappointed in my expectation of sending Letters by them--I went lately to the only dance I have been to these twelve months or shall go to for twelve months again--it was to our Brother in laws' cousin's--She gave a dance for her Birthday and I went for the sake of Mrs Wylie. I am waiting every day to hear from George. I trust there is no harm in the silence: other people are in the same expectation as we are. On looking at your seal

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