The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

I guess live in them, romantic old maids fond of no〈vels〉 or soldiers widows with a pretty jointure--or any body's widows or aunts or anythings given to Poetry and a Piano forte--as far as in 'em lies--as people say. If I could play upon the Guitar I might make my fortune with an old song--and get t〈w〉o blessings at once--a Lady's heart and the Rheumatism. But I am almost affraid to peep at those little windows--for a pretty window should show a pretty face, and as the world goes chances are against me. I am living with a very good fellow indeed, a Mr Rice. He is unfortunately labouring under a complaint which has for some years been a burthen to him. This is a pain to me. He has a greater tact in speaking to people of the village than I have, and in those matters is a great amusement as well 〈as〉 a good friend to me. He bought a ham the other day for say〈s〉 he ' Keats, I don't think a Ham is a wrong thing to have in a house.' Write to me, Shanklin Isle of Wight, as soon as you can; for a Letter is a great treat to me here--believeing me ever

Your affectionate Brother, John --


136. To FANNY BRAWNE. Thursday 8 July 1819.

Address: Miss Brawne ∣ Wentworth Place ∣ Hampstead ∣ Middx

Postmarks: NEWPORT and 10 JY 1819.

July 8th

My sweet Girl,

Your Letter gave me more delight, than any thing in the world but yourself could do; indeed I am almost astonished that any absent one should have that luxurious power over my senses which I feel. Even when I am not thinking of you I receive your influence and a tenderer nature steeling upon me. All my thoughts, my unhappiest days and nights have I find not at all cured me of my love of Beauty, but made it so intense that I am miserable that you are not with me: or rather breathe in that dull sort of patience that cannot be called Life. I never knew before, what such a love as you have made me feel, was; I did not believe in it; my Fancy was affraid of it, lest it should burn me up. But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures. You mention 'horrid people' and ask me whether it depend upon

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