The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

seeing you enjoy it. One of the pleasantest things I have seen lately was at Cowes. The Regent in his Yatch1 (I think they spell it) was anchored oppoisite--a beautiful vessel--and all the Yatchs and boats on the coast, were passing and repassing it; and curcuiting and tacking about it in every direction--I never beheld any thing so, silent, light, and graceful--As we pass'd over to Southampton, there was nearly an accident. There came by a Boat well mann'd; with t〈w〉o naval officers at the stern. Our Bowlines took the top of their little mast and snapped it off close by the bo〈a〉rd--Had the mast been a little stouter they would have been upset. In so trifling an event I could not help admiring our Seamen--Neither officer nor man in the whole Boat moved a Muscle--they scar〈c〉ely notic'd it even with words--Forgive me for this flint-worded Letter, and believe and see that I cannot think of you without some sort of energy--though mal a propos--Even as I leave off it seems to me that a few more moments thought of you would uncrystallize and dissolve me. I must not give way to it--but turn to my writing again--if I fail I shall die hard. O my love, your lips are growing sweet again to my fancy--I must forget them. Ever your affectionate

Keats--


144. To JOHN TAYLOR. Monday 23 Aug. 1819.

Address: John Taylor, Esqre ∣ Taylor and Hessey ∣ Fleet Street ∣ London

Postmark: WINCHESTER 23 AU 1819

Winchester Monday morn.
24 Augst.

My dear Taylor--

You will perceive that I do not write you till I am forced by necessity: that I am sorry for. You must forgive me for entering abrubtly on the subject, merely prefixing an entreaty that you will not consider my business manner of wording and proceeding any distrust of, or stirrup standing against you; but put it to the account of a desire of order and regularity. I have been rather unfortunate lately in money concerns--from a threatened chancery suit. I was deprived at once of all recourse to my Guardian. I relied

____________________
1
This orthography was not in Keats's time wholly unauthorized; it was used by Evelyn and by Horace Walpole.

-371-

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