The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

have heard of the statutes at large being chang'd into the Statutes at Small and printed for a watch paper.

Your sisters by this time must have got the Devonshire ees--short ees--you know 'em--they are the prettiest ees in the Language. O how I admire the middle-siz'd delicate Devonshire girls of about 15. There was one at an Inn door holding a quartem of brandy--the very thought of her kept me warm a whole stage--and a 16 miler too-- "You'll pardon me for being jocular."

Ever your affectionate friend
John Keats--


152. To RICHARD WOODHOUSE. Tuesday 21 Sept. 1819.

Address: To Mr Richd Woodhouse ∣ 8. Duke Street ∣ Bath.

Postmark: WINCHESTER 22 SE 1819

Tuesday--

Dear Woodhouse,

If you see what I have said to Reynolds before you come to your own dose you will put it between the bars unread; provided they have begun fires in Bath--I should like a bit of fire to night--one likes a bit of fire--How glorious the Blacksmiths' shops look now. I stood to night before one till I was verry near listing for one. Yes I should like a bit of fire--at a distance about 4 feet 'not quite hob nob'1--as Wordsworth says. The fact was I left Town on Wednesday--determined to be in a hurry. You don't eat travelling--you're wrong--beef--beef--I like the look of a sign. The Coachman's face says eat eat, eat. I never feel more contemptible than when I am sitting by a goodlooking coachman. One is nothing--Perhaps I eat to persuade myself I am somebody. You must be when slice after slice--but it wont do--the Coachman nibbles a bit of bread--he's favour'd--he's had a Call--a Hercules Methodist--Does he live by bread alone? O that I were a Stage Manager--perhaps that's as old as 'doubling the Cape.' "How are ye old 'un? hey! why dont'e speak?' O that I had so sweet a Breast to sing as the Coachman hath! I'd give a penny for his Whistle--and bow to the Girls on the road--Bow--nonsense--'tis a nameless graceful slang action. Its effect on the women suited to it must be delightful. It touches 'em in the ribs--en passant--

____________________
1
'The Idiot Boy', l. 289.

-386-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of John Keats
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 566

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.