The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

be one of the least incitements to the plan I purpose pursuing. I had got into a habit of mind of looking towards you as a help in all difficulties. This very habit would be the parent of idleness and difficulties. You will see it is a duty I owe myself to break the neck of it. I do nothing for my subsistence--make no exertion. At the end of another year you shall applaud me, not for verses, but for conduct. If you live at Hampstead next winter-----I like * * * * * * * * and I cannot help it. On that account I had better not live there. While I have some immediate cash,1 I had better settle myself quietly, and fag on as others do. I shall apply to Hazlitt, who knows the market as well as any one, for something to bring me in a few pounds as soon as possible. I shall not suffer my pride to hinder me. The whisper may go round; I shall not hear it. If I can get an article in the 'Edinburgh,' I will. One must not be delicate. Nor let this disturb you longer than a moment. I look forward with a good hope that we shall one day be passing free, untrammelled, unanxious time together. That can never be if I continue a dead lump.2 . . . I shall be expecting anxiously an answer from you. If if does not arrive in a few days this will have miscarried, and I shall come straight to 〈 Bedhampton?〉 before I go to town, which you, I am sure, will agree had better be done while I still have some ready cash. By the middle of October I shall expect you in London. We will then set at the theatres. If you have anything to gainsay, I shall be even as the deaf adder which stoppeth her cars.3

* * * * * *


155. To CHARLES BROWN. Thursday 23 Sept. 1819.

Address and postmark not recorded.

Winchester, 23 September 1819.

* * * * * *

Do not suffer me to disturb you unpleasantly: I do not mean that you should not suffer me to occupy your

____________________
1
'The cash', observes Dilke, 'borrowed from Taylor--£30 a fortnight before--on the 5th.' See Letter 149, p. 379.
2
Cf. Letter 153, p. 393.
3
Psalm lviii. 4.

155. Lord Houghton says:--'The gloomy tone of this correspondence soon brought Mr. Brown to Winchester. Up to that period Keats had always expressed himself most averse to writing for any

-396-

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