The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

particularly Sr John Leicesters good lord deliver us--I shall expect to see your Picture plumped out like a ripe Peach-- you would not be very willing to give me a slice of it. I came to this place in the hopes of meeting with a Library but was disappointed. The High Street is as quiet as a Lamb; the knockers are dieted to three raps per diem. The walks about are interresting--from the many Buildings and arch ways--The view of the high street through the Gate of the City, in the beautiful September evening light has amused me frequently. The bad singing of the Cathedral I do not care to smoke--being by myself I am not very coy in my taste. At St. Cross there is an interresting Picture of Albert Dürers1--who living in such warlike times perhaps was forced to paint in his Gauntlets--so we must make all allowances--

I am my dear Haydon

Yours ever John Keats

Brown has a few words to say to you and will cross this

My dear Sir,

I heard yesterday you had written to me at Hampstead. I have not recd. your letter. You must, I think, accuse me of neglect, but indeed I do not merit it. This many worded Keats has left me no room to say more.--I shall be in Town in a few days.--

Your's truly

Chas. Brown.


159. To FANNY BRAWNE. Monday 11 Oct. 1819.

Address: Miss Brawne ∣ Wentworth Place ∣ Hampstead.

Postmark: 11 OC 1819 College Street.

My sweet Girl,

I am living to day in yesterday: I was in a complete fa〈s〉cination all day. I feel myself at your mercy. Write

____________________
of the picture of Macbeth commissioned by Sir George Beaumont some ten years before--an affair concerning which he declared thirty-one years after its occurrence that he was 'still suffering from its fatal effects'. Mr. Blunden attributes the trouble to Sir George's having told Haydon he regretted his answering his opponents instead of painting on undisturbed. Lord Mulgrave did not support Haydon's idea of getting a grant of public money for art; and Sir John Fleming Leicester, first Lord de Tabley ( 1762-1827), another of Haydon's patrons, engaged William Carey (see p. 433, note 3) to publish a catalogue of his pictures.
1
The painting is no longer in the Hospital of St. Cross.

159. It would seem to have been at No. 25 College Street that

-434-

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