The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

me ever so few lines and tell you 〈for me〉 you will never for ever be less kind to me than yesterday--. You dazzled me. There is nothing in the world so bright and delicate. When Brown came out with that seemingly true story again〈s〉t me last night, I felt it would be death to me if you had ever believed it--though against any one else I could muster up my obstinacy. Before I knew Brown could disprove it I was for the moment miserable. When shall we pass a day alone? I have had a thousand kisses, for which with my whole soul I thank love--but if you should deny me the thousand and first--'twould put me to the proof how great a misery I could live through. If you should ever carry your threat yesterday into execution--believe me 'tis not my pride, my vanity or any petty passion would torment me--really 'twould hurt my heart--I could not bear it. I have seen Mrs Dilke this morning; she says she will come with me any fine day.

Ever yours

John Keats

Ah hertè mine!


160. To FANNY BRAWNE. Wednesday 13 Oct. 1819.

Address: Miss Brawne ∣ Wentworth Place ∣ Hampstead--

Postmarks: COLLEGE ST and 13 OC 1819

25 College Street.

My dearest Girl,

This moment I have set myself to copy some verses out fair. I cannot proceed with any degree of content. I must write you a line or two and see if that will assist in dismissing you from my Mind for ever so short a time. Upon my Soul I can think of nothing else. The time is passed when I had power to advise and warn you against the unpromising morning of my Life. My love has made me selfish. I cannot exist without you. I am forgetful of every thing but

____________________
Dilke obtained for Keats the rooms which the poet asked him to find in Letter 157. How long Keats remained in those rooms I have been unable to determine, to a day; but in Letter 161, headed 'Wentworth Place', and postmarked the 16th of October 1819 (p. 436), he speaks of having 'returned to Hampstead', after lodging 'two or three days . . . in the neighbourhood of Mrs. Dilke'. In Letter 162 he writes from Great Smith Street (the address of the Dilkes) of his purpose to live at Hampstead. I suppose the 'three days dream' there referred to was a visit to Mrs. Brawne's house, from which he proceeded to Mrs. Dilke's--there to come to a final resolution of living at Hampstead.

-435-

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