The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

happier news from you before I can write with an untrammell'd mind. Nothing could have in all its circumstances fallen out worse for me than the last year has done, or could be more damping to my poetical talent--I comfort myself in the idea that you are a consolation to each other. Haslam told me the last time I saw him that he was about to write to you. He is entirely taken up with his Sweet-heart --I feel very loath to write more than this Sheet--you must excuse the shortness of this Letter for1 the length of the last and the length of the next I hope, if any thing occurs to enspirit 〈me a〉 little. Fanny would like a Letter from you. I should 〈think〉 that Abbey from the delay of Waltons2 house has employed 〈anothe〉r Lawyer on our Business. Mrs. Jennings has not instituted 〈an〉y action against us yet, nor has she withdrawn her claim I think I told you that even if she were to lose her cause we sho〈u〉ld have to pay the expences of the Suit. You urg'd me to get Mr. Abbey to advance you money--that he will by no means do--for besides the risk of the law (small enough indeed) he will never be persu〈a〉ded but you will loose it in America. For a bit of a treat in the heart of all this I had a most abusive Letter from Fry2--committing you and myself to destruction without reprieve--In your next Letter make some questions regularly upon which you wish to be in〈form〉ed concerning our's and any other subject and I will answer 〈them as〉 amply as I can. My dear Sister God bless you and your 〈baby gir〉l. The enquir〈i〉es about you are very frequent--My dear George I remain, in hopes,

Your most affectionate Brother
John Keats


168. To JOSEPH SEVERN. Monday 〈6 Dec.?〉 1819.

Address and postmark, see note.

Wentworth Place
Monday Morn--

My dear Severn,

I am very sorry that on Tuesday I have an appointment in the City of an undeferable nature; and Brown on the

____________________
1
Keats wrote 'by' first and then 'for' over it.
2
Cf. Letter 156, p. 398.

168. This letter is given from a manuscript without date, address, or postmark; but I think there can be no doubt the proposed visit to the Academy was for the purpose of seeing Severn's 'Cave of Despair'

-443-

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