The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

177. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne.

No postmark.

My sweet love, I shall wait patiently till to-morrow before I see you, and in the mean time, if there is any need of such a thing, assure you by your Beauty, that whenever I have at any time written on a certain unpleasant subject, it has been with your welfare impress'd upon my mind. How hurt I should have been had you ever acceded to what is, notwithstanding, very reasonable! How much the more do I love you from the general result! In my present state of Health I feel too much separated from you and could almost speak to you in the words of Lorenzo's Ghost to Isabella

Your Beauty grows upon me and I feel
A greater love through all my essence steal.1

My greatest torment since I have known you has been the fear of you being a little inclined to the Cressid;2 but that suspicion I dismiss utterly and remain happy in the surety of your Love, which I assure you is as much a wonder to me as a delight. Send me the words 'Good night' to put under my pillow.

Dearest Fanny,

Your affectionate

J. K.


178. To FANNY KEATS. Friday 11 Feb. 1820.3

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey Esqre ∣ Pancras Lane ∣ Queen Street Cheapside

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 11 FE 1820

Wentworth Place

My dear Fanny,

I am much the same as when I last wrote. I hope a little more verging towards improvement. Yesterday

____________________
1
"'Isabella', xl". 7-8.
2
Cf. "'Troilus and Cressida', III". ii. 203, see Letter 223, p. 501.
3
On the same day Brown wrote to ' Master Henry Snook, at Mr Lord's Academy, Tooting, Surrey', a letter from which the following passage is extracted as having a certain value in connexion with Keats's story: Mr Keats fell very ill yesterday week, and my office of head Nurse has too much employed me to allow of my answering your letter immediately; he is somewhat better, but I'm in a very

-461-

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