The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

morning being very fine, I took a walk for a quarter of an hour in the garden and was very much refresh'd by it. You must consider no news, good news--if you do not hear from me the day after tomorrow--

Your affectionate Brother

John


179. To FANNY KEATS. Monday 14 Feb. 1820.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey Esqre ∣ Pancras Lane Queen St∣ Cheapside

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 14 FE 1820

Wentworth Place

Monday Morn--

My dear Fanny,

I am improving but very gradually and suspect it will be a long while before I shall be able to walk six miles--The Sun appears half inclined to shine; if he obliges us I shall take a turn in the garden this morning. No one from Town has visited me since my last. I have had so many presents of jam and jellies that they would reach side by side the length of the sideboard. I hope I shall be well before it is all consumed. I am vex'd that Mr Abbey will not allow you pocket money sufficient. He has not behaved well--By detaining money from me and George when we most wanted it he has increased our expences. In consequence

____________________
anxious state about him.--I was in hopes of you and Jack being able, during Easter, to go to the Theatre to witness our Tragedy; but no,-- at Drury Lane they engaged to play it next Season, and I, not liking the delay, took it home.--Here, to amuse myself, I began to copy some of my favorite Hogarth's heads; they were in Indian ink as usual; when Mr Severn (I think you know him) put me on another plan, and I hope to succeed. I must tell you about Mr Severn, whether you know him or not: he is a young Artist, who lately strove with his fellow students for a gold medal, which the Royal Academy gives annually for the best historical painting; the subject was fixed to be the Cave of Despair as described in Spencer's poem; it was Mr Severn's second attempt in oil colours, and therefore it might have been supposed he stood no chance of success, and yet he won it!--it has been so much approved of that he will have his expenses paid for three years during his travels on the Continent, and his Majesty is to furnish him with letters of recommendation. What think you of this? I tell it you as a proof there is still some good reward in the world for superior talent; now and then a man of talent is disregarded, but it is an error to believe that such is the common fate of true desert. This does not apply solely to genius in the arts, but to you and me and all of us, as to our general character and capability.'--H.B.F.

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