The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

of such delay George was obliged to take his voyage to england which will be £150 out of his Pocket. I enclose you a Note--You shall hear from me again the day after tomorrow.

Your affectionate Brother

John


180. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne

No postmark.

My dearest Girl,

According to all appearances I am to be separated from you as much as possible. How I shall be able to bear it, or whether it will not be worse than your presence now and then, I cannot tell. I must be patient, and in the mean time you must think of it as little as possible. Let me not longer detain you from going to Town--there may be no end to this imprisoning of you. Perhaps you had better not come before tomorrow evening: send me however without fail a good night.

You know our situation--what hope is there if I should be recoverd ever so soon--my very health with 〈for will〉 not suffer me to make any great exertion. I am reccommended not even to read poetry, much less write it. I wish I had even a little hope. I cannot say forget me--but I would mention that there are impossibilities in the world. No more of this. I am not strong enough to be weaned-- take no notice of it in your good night.

Happen what may I shall ever be my dearest Love

Your affectionate

J-- K--


181. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne.

No postmark.

My dearest Girl, how could it ever have been my wish to forget you? how could I have said such a thing? The utmost stretch my mind has been capable of was to endeavour to forget you for your own sake seeing what a change 〈for chance〉 there was of my remaining in a precarious state of health. I would have borne it as I would bear death if fate was in that humour: but I should as soon think of choosing to die as to part from you. Believe too my Love that our friends think and speak for the best, and

-463-

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