The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

has sent me not only his Sicilian Story but yesterday his Dramatic Scenes--this is very polite and I shall do what I can to make him sensible I think so. I confess they tease me--they are composed of Amiability--the Seasons, the Leaves, the Moon &c. upon which he rings (according to Hunt's expression) triple bob majors. However that is nothing--I think he likes poetry for its own sake, not his. I hope I shall soon be well enough to proceed with my fa〈e〉ries1 and set you about the notes on Sundays and Stray-days. If I had been well enough I should have liked to cross the water with you. Brown wishes you a pleasant voyage--Have fish for dinner at the sea ports, and dont forget a bottle of Claret. You will not meet with so much to hate at Brussels as at Paris. Remember me to all my friends. If I were well enough I would paraphrase an Ode of Horace's for you, on your embarking in the seventy years ago style--the Packet will bear a comparison with a roman galley at any rate.

Ever yours affectionately

J. Keats


191. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Monday 28 Feb. 1820?〉 Address: Miss Brawne No postmark.

My dearest Fanny,

I had a better night last night than I have had since my attack, and this morning I am the same as when you saw me. I have been turning over two volumes of Letters written between Rousseau and two Ladies in the perplexed strain of mingled finesse and sentiment in which the Ladies and gentlemen of those days were so clever, and which is still prevalent among Ladies of this Country who live in a state of re〈a〉soning romance. The likeness however only extends to the mannerism, not to the dexterity. What would Rousseau have said at seeing our little correspondence!2 What would his Ladies have said! I don't care much--I would sooner have Shakspeare's

____________________
'B. W. Procter Esqre ∣ with ye Authors ∣ best regards.' In the same collection is a holograph of the sonnet 'On the Grasshopper and the Cricket', dated ' Decr 30 1816' and certified 'This is Keats's writing B.W.P.'
1
i.e. 'The Cap and Bells'.
2
Cf. Letter 134, p. 352.

-471-

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