The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

if that would be any relief to me. No 'twould not. I will be as obdurate as a Robin. I will not sing in a cage. Health is my expected heaven and you are my Houri--this word I believe is both singular and plural--if only plural, never mind--you are a thousand of them.

Ever yours affectionately

my dearest--

You had better not come to-day.

J. K.


195. To MRS. WYLIE. Friday 〈March 1829?〉 Address: Mrs Wylie ∣ Romney Street Postmark: Not recorded. Wentworth Place

Friday Morn.1

My dear Mrs Wylie.

I have been very negligent in not letting you hear from me for so long a time considering the anxiety I know you feel for me. Charles has been here this morning and will tell you that I am better. Just as he came in I was sitting down to write to you, and I shall not let his visit supersede these few lines. Charles enquired whether I had heard from George. It is impossible to guess whether he has landed yet, and if he has it will take at least a month for any communication to reach us. I hope you keep your

No, if this slighted heart must see
Its faithful pulse decay,
Oh! let it die, remembering thee,
And, like the burnt aroma, be
Consumed in sweets away!

____________________
1
This letter is difficult to date with any degree of accuracy. Amy Lowell placed it 'before Mrs Wylie had made her first visit, some time, probably, toward the end of February'. The date of the first visit of Mrs. Wylie recorded by Keats was Monday, the 7th of February 1820 (see Letter 175, p. 459), and the only other visit Keats mentions is that in Letter 197 (p. 477) which is undated though presumed to have been written early in March. George had sailed from Liverpool about the 1st of February, and there is good reason to believe that he had rejoined his wife and family in Kentucky by the middle of March. On the 1st of April Keats wrote to his sister that he had not heard from George since he left Liverpool and apparently Mrs. Wylie was the first to learn of George's arrival in America, as in the letter to Fanny Keats postmarked '21 Ap 1820' John says--'Mr H. Wylie call'd on me yesterday with a letter from George to his mother: George is safe at the other side of the water, perhaps by this time arrived at his home.'

-474-

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