The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

speculations to molest you any more: nor will I any more believe you can have the least pique against me. Brown is gone out--but here is Mrs Wylie1--when she is gone I shall be awake for you.--Remembrances to your Mother. Your affectionate

J. Keats.


198. To CHARLES WENTWORTH DILKE. Saturday 4 March 1820.

Address: Mr Chas. W. Dilke ∣ 3 Great Smith Street ∣ West- minster.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 4 MR 1820

My dear Dilke,

Since I saw you I have been gradually, too gradually perhaps, improving; and though under an interdict with respect to animal food living upon pseudo victuals, Brown says I have pick'd up a little flesh, lately. If I can keep off inflammation for the next six weeks I trust I shall do very well. You certainly should have been at Martin's dinner for making an index is surely as dull work as engraving. Have you heard that the Bookseller is going to tie himself to the manger eat or not as he pleases? He says Rice shall have his foot on the fender notwithstanding. Reynolds is going to sail on the salt seas. Brown has been mightily progressing with his Hogarth.2 A damn'd melancholy picture it is, and during the first week of my illness it gave me a psalm singing nightmare, that made me almost faint away in my sleep. I know I am better, for I can bear the Picture. I have experienced a specimen of great politeness from Mr Barry Cornwall. He has sent me his books. Some time ago he had given his first publish'd book to Hunt for me; Hunt forgot to give it and Barry Cornwall thinking I had received it must have though〈t〉 me 〈a〉 very neglectful fellow. Notwithstan〈din〉g he sent me his

____________________
1
The significant but indicates that the absence of Brown was still, as was natural, more or less a condition of the presence of Miss Brawne. That Keats had, however, or thought he had, some reason for this condition, beyond the mere delicacy of lovers, is dimly shadowed by the cold My dear Fanny with which in Letter 193 the condition was first expressly prescribed, and more than shadowed by the agonized expression of a morbid sensibility in two letters which will be found further on. Probably a man in sound health would have found the cause trivial enough.--H.B.F.
2
See Letter 183, p. 465.

-477-

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