The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

Twas originally written

"her maiden eyes divine Fix'd on the floor saw many a sweeping train Pass by--

My meaning is quite destroyed in the alteration. I do not use train for concourse of passers by but for

Skirts sweeping along the floor.

In the first Stanza my copy reads--2nd line

"bitter chill it was"

to avoid the echo cold in the next line.

ever yours sincerely
John Keats


218. To CHARLES BROWN. 〈June 1820.〉

Address and postmark not recorded.

My dear Brown,

I have only been to -----'s once since you left, when ----- could not find your letters. Now this is bad of me. I should, in this instance, conquer the great aversion to breaking up my regular habits, which grows upon me more and more. True, I have an excuse in the weather, which drives one from shelter to shelter in any little excursion. I have not heard from George. My book1 is coming out with very low hopes, though not spirits, on my part. This shall be my last trial; not succeeding, I shall try what I can do in the apothecary line. When you hear from or see ----- it is probable you will hear some complaints against me, which this notice is not intended to forestall. The fact is, I did behave badly; but it is to be attributed to my health, spirits, and the disadvantageous ground I stand on in society. I could go and accommodate matters if I were not too weary of the world. I know that they are more happy and comfortable than I am; therefore why should I trouble myself about it? I foresee I shall know very few people in the course of a year or two. Men get such different habits that they become as oil and vinegar

218. This undated letter belongs to the time between the 7th of May 1820, when Brown left for Scotland and Keats went to Kentish Town, and the 23rd of June, when Keats wrote to his sister that he had heard from George.

____________________
1
'Lamia, Isabella, &c.'

-492-

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