The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDONto KEATS.1July 1820.〉

Address: John Keats

No postmark.

My dear Keats,

I have been coming every day for months to see you, and determined this morning as I heard you were still ill or worse to walk over in spite of all pestering hindrances I regret my very dear Keats to find by your Landlady's account that you are very poorly I hope you have Darling's advice, on whose skill I have the greatest reliance-- certainly I was as bad as any body could be, and I have recovered, therefore, I hope, indeed I have no doubt, you will ultimately get round again, if you attend strictly to yourself, & avoid cold & night air.--I wish you would write me a line to say how you really are.--I have been sitting for some little time in your Lodgings which are clean, airy, & quiet--I wish to God you were sitting with me--I am sorry to hear Hunt has been laid up too--take care of yourself my dear Keats--& believe me

ever most affectionately & sincerely

your Friend

B. R. Haydon

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDONto KEATS. Friday 14 July 1820.

Address: John Keats Esq | Wesleyan Place I Kentish Town

No postmark.

My dear Keats,

When I called the other morning, I did not know your Poems were out, or I should have read them before I came in order to tell you my opinion--I have done so since, and really cannot tell you how very highly I estimate them--they justify the assertions of all your Friends regarding your poetical powers. I can assure you, whatever you may do, you will not exceed my opinion of them. Have you done with Chapman's Homer? I want it very badly at this moment; will you let the bearer have it, as well as let me know how you are?

I am dear Keats

ever yours

July 14 1820. B. R. Haydon

229. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. 〈14 Aug. 1820.〉

No address or postmark.

My dear Haydon,

I am sorry to be obliged to try your patience a few more days when you will have the Book sent from Town. I am

____________________
1
This note was written in Keats's lodgings in Kentish Town, probably a day or two before the 14th of July, on a piece of the same paper Keats was using--a different paper to that used by Haydon.

-509-

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