The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

I am indicating at as dull a rate as a battered finger-post in wet weather. Not that I am ill: for I am very well altogether.

Your affectionate friend,

Leigh Hunt.


231. To JOHN TAYLOR. Monday 14 Aug. 182o.

Address: John Taylor Esqre ∣ Taylor & Hessey ∣ Booksellers ∣ Fleet Street

Postmark: 14 Au 1820

Wentworth Place.

My dear Taylor--

I do not think I mentioned any thing of a Passage to Leghorn by Sea. Will you join that to your enquiries, and, if you can, give a peep at the Birth if the Vessel is in our river?

Your sincere friend
John Keats
over

P.S. Some how a Copy of Chapman's Homer, lent to me by Haydon, has disappeared from my Lodgings--it has quite flown I am affraid, and Haydon urges the return of it so that I must get one at Longman's and send it to Lisson grove--or you must--or as I have given you a job on the River--ask Mistessey.1 I had written a Note to this effect to Hessey some time since but crumpled it up in hopes that the Book might come to Light. This morning Haydon has sent another messenger. The Copy was in good condition, with the head. Damn all thieves! Tell Woodhouse I have not lost his Blackwood.

Taylor endorsed this letter as follows:--

'Inclosed in his Letter I received a Testamentary Paper in John Keats's Handwriting without Date on which I have indorsed a Memorandum to this Effect for the purpose of identifying it, & for better Security it is hereunto annexed

John Taylor.'

22 Sep 1820

[Testamentary Paper2]

In case of my death this scrap of Paper may be servic〈e〉able in your possession.

____________________
1
Mr. Hessey.
2
First printed, without names, in Hone 'Table Book' ( 1828), col. 430, in a letter to the Editor signed 'O.Z.' which says: 'This paper was intended by him to operate as his last will and testament, but the

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