The Letters of John Keats

By John Keats; Maurice Buxton Forman | Go to book overview

but still there is a tendency to class women in my books with roses and sweetmeats,--they never see themselves dominant1. If ever I come to publish "Lucy Vaughan Lloyd,"2 there will be some delicate picking for squeamish stomachs. I will say no more, but, waiting in anxiety for your answer, doff my hat, and make a purse as long as I can.

Your affectionate friend,
John Keats.

From RICHARD ABBEYto KEATS. Wednesday 23 Aug 1820.

No address or postmark.

Pancrass Lane Aug 23, 1820

Mr John Keats

Dear Sir

I have yours of Sunday and am exceedingly grieved at the contents --You know that it was very much against my will that you lent your money to George--In my settlement with him Mr Hodgkinson omitted a 50£ bill which he had drawn from America & not then due, so that he got this 50£ more than I knew of at the time--

Bad debts for the last two years have cut down the profits of our business to nothing, so that I can scarcely take out enough for my private expence--It is therefore not in my power to lend you any thing--I am

Dear Sir
Yrs--
Richd Abbey

When you are able to call I shall be glad to see you, as I should not like to see you want "maintenance for the day"


236. To FANNY KEATS. Monday 11 Sept. 1820.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd- Abbeys Esq ∣ Walthamstow

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 12 o'clock SP 12 1820 Nn and 4 o'clock

SP 12 1820 EV Monday Morn

My dear Fanny

In the hope of entirely re-establishing my health I shall leave England for Italy this week and, of course I shall not be able to see you before my departure. It is not illness that prevents me from writing but as I am recommended to avoid every sort of fatigue I have accepted the assistance of a friend, who I have desired to write to you when I am gone and to communicate any intelligence she may hear of me. I am as well as I can expect and feel

____________________
1
Cf. Letter 100, p. 270.
2
i.e. 'The Cap and Bells', cf. Letter 218, p. 493.

236. This letter, including the signature, is entirely in the handwriting of Fanny Brawne.

-517-

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