The Development of International Law after the World War

By Otfried Nippold; Amos S. Hershey | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

FOR the past twenty years nobody has been more interested than the author of this little book in the creation of an international law which shall meet the needs of the world and be developed in accordance with the principles of justice which either are or should be universally accepted. Nobody has been more interested in analysing new institutions and endeavouring to make them effective. His work on the development of procedure in international disputes ( Die Fortbildung des Verfahrens in völkerrechtlichen Streitigkeiten), which appeared in 1907, advocated a development of arbitral procedure, and it is not too much to say that the book was worthy of the great subject. Nobody has been more interested in international conferences, especially in the Hague Conferences, or has shown greater skill in describing their proceedings, analysing their results, and criticizing them in the light of a rational development. A German by birth, he has preferred to be a citizen of Switzerland, and his aim has been to bring German conceptions of international law into an approximate relation with the conceptions obtaining in his adopted country and in countries where the development of international law is less closely connected with patriotic ambitions and political projects.

In these circumstances it was to be expected that Professor Nippold would be profoundly moved by the outbreak of the war in 1914; that he would follow its conduct, especially on the part of the Germans, with intense interest and relentless criticism, inasmuch as he had foreseen in Prussian militarism danger of a catastrophe, and in the success of Prussian militarism the blasting of hopes for a rational system of international relations in the future, of which he had made himself in a way the protector and the prophet. Germany's conduct in the war is the subject of a series of monographs from his facile pen which is in course of publication.

To the larger field of international relations, and especially to

-v-

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The Development of International Law after the World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • INTRODUCTORY NOTE v
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- INTERNATIONAL LAW 11
  • I- Ld Postulates 13
  • II- New Postulates 27
  • Part II- THE LAW OF WAR 107
  • Appendix 191
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