New Immigrant Literatures in the United States: A Sourcebook to Our Multicultural Literary Heritage

By Alpana Sharma Knippling | Go to book overview

tion of Sención Los que falsificaron la firma de Dios ( Willimantic, CT: Curbstone Press), Dominican novels will reach a wider audience in the United States.

One genre that appears to be flourishing at the present time is that of migratory narratives written from the perspective of children and intended for young readers. Such books as Ginger Gordon My Two Worlds (featuring Kirsy Rodriguez) and Mildred Leinweber Dawson Over Here It's Different: Carolina's Story (told by Carolina Loranzo) emerge from the specific needs of the New York public school system to address the bicultural and bilingual backgrounds of many of the students. Told from the perspective of two elementary school students, both narratives depict the two largest colonias dominicanas in New York City, upper Manhattan and Queens, as well as representing the experiences of eldest daughters adjusting to either single-parent or two-income households. The narratives legitimate the existence of nonnuclear or regionally separated families, as well as portraying the reality of overcrowded apartments, return trips to visit grandparents, and the challenges of learning English. What is significant is how these narratives address the issue of divided loyalties between two different worlds, where students may have close family members in both places. Neither Kirsy nor Carolina is made to choose between being American and Dominican; instead they encourage the young readers to accept their biculturality. My Two Worlds, for example, concludes with the following affirmation: "Sometimes I wonder if I'd rather live in the Dominican Republic instead of New York City. Well, I don't know. I'm glad I don't have to choose. I belong to both worlds and each is a part of me" (44).

This emphasis on continuity rather than disjuncture largely characterizes the emergent immigrant literature of Dominicans living in the United States. This body of literature, currently in the process of definition, consolidation, and distribution, is truly a traveling literature that circulates between New York and Santo Domingo. The migratory nature of this literature, published and read in both the metropolis and the island, not only represents a nascent tradition of a relatively recent immigrant group but also provides an important basis for a Pan-American literary tradition.


SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alvarez Julia. "An American Childhood in the Dominican Republic." American Scholar 56 (Winter 1987): 71-85.

-----. Homecoming. New York: Grove Press, 1984.

-----. How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991.

-----. "My English." Punto 7 Review: A Journal of Marginal Discourse 2. 2 (Fall 1992): 24-29.

Dawson Mildred Leinweber. Over Here It's Different: Carolina's Story. Photographs by George Ancona. New York: Macmillan, 1993.

Espaillat Rhina. "Learning Bones." Sarah's Daughters Sing: A Sampler of Poems byJewish Women

-216-

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New Immigrant Literatures in the United States: A Sourcebook to Our Multicultural Literary Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Works Cited xix
  • I - Asian-American Literatures 1
  • 1 - Arab-American Literature 3
  • Conclusion 15
  • Notes 15
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 16
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 17
  • 2 - Armenian-American Literature Khachig Tololyan 19
  • Conclusion 37
  • Notes 39
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 40
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 41
  • 3 - Chinese-American Literature 43
  • Introduction 43
  • Notes 62
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 62
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 63
  • 4 - Filipino American Literature Nerissa Balce-Cortes and Jean Vengua Gier 67
  • Conclusion 84
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 86
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 87
  • 5 - Indian-American Literature 91
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 105
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 107
  • 6 - Iranian-American Literature Nasrin Rahimieh 109
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 122
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 123
  • 7 - Japanese-American Literature Benzi Zhang 125
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 140
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 141
  • 8 - Korean-American Literature 143
  • Conclusion 151
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 152
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 154
  • 9 - Pakistani-American Literature Sunil Sharma 159
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 164
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 167
  • II - Caribbean-American Literatures 169
  • 10 - Anglophone Caribbean-American Literature 171
  • 11 - Cuban-American Literature 187
  • Conclusion 203
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 204
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 205
  • 12 - Dominican-American Literature 207
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 216
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 218
  • 13 - Puerto Rican-American Literature Carrie Tirado Bramen 221
  • Conclusion 234
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 234
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 237
  • III - European-American Literatures 241
  • 14 - Finnish-American Literature 243
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 251
  • 15 - Greek-American Literature 253
  • Conclusion 259
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 259
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 261
  • 16 - Irish-American Literature 265
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 276
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 279
  • 17 - Italian/American Literature 281
  • Conclusion 287
  • Notes 290
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 291
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 292
  • 18 - Jewish-American Literature 295
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 305
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 307
  • 19 - Sephardic Jewish-American Literature 309
  • Introduction 309
  • Conclusion 313
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 314
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 316
  • 20 - Polish-American Literature 319
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 326
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 327
  • 21 - Slovak-American and Czech-American Literature 329
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 337
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 338
  • IV Mexican-American Literatures 339
  • 22 - Mexican-American Literature Ada Savin 341
  • Conclusion 357
  • Notes 359
  • Selected Primary Bibliography 360
  • Selected Secondary Bibliography 362
  • Selected Bibliography 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Contributors 383
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