The Lake of Elsinore

Along the road to Elsinore
I saw three swallows winging,
Beyond the mountains toward the shore
Where a high blue wind was singing.

Now it was spring in Elsinore
When I saw the swallows flying,
And silver strands on the lake's blue floor
Showed how the wind was dying.

And bluer than the blue beyond,
Their wings, and whiter still
Their breasts than clouds that poise and stand
Driftless, above a hill.

And were they lost from Camelot,
Or were they lost from Rome,
Or had they nests in a hidden spot,
And were they faring home?

I will go back to Elsinore
In search of swallows' wings,
Since the world below the blue hills' core
Grows dim with dreary things.

-35-

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Bright Ambush: Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • About the Author xi
  • Contents xv
  • Bright Ambush 1
  • Love's Instant 3
  • To Galatea 4
  • For Eros 5
  • The Word 19
  • Harvest 20
  • The Silent Voice 21
  • Winged Joy 23
  • I Am a Samson 24
  • The Eagle's Wing 27
  • Text 31
  • Dirge 32
  • The Loneliness of Autumn 33
  • The Grace of Gold 34
  • The Lake of Elsinore 35
  • She Who Was All Piety 37
  • On Silken Hand 38
  • The Fallow Year 39
  • In Praise of the Passing of Time 41
  • Seed 42
  • The Weavers 44
  • Spring Song 45
  • Microcosmos 46
  • Satyrs in the Sand 47
  • Far God, Unseen 48
  • Borzoi 49
  • Only the Blackbird 50
  • Keen Cold 51
  • East of the Sun 52
  • Books and Roses 54
  • Mountain Moon 55
  • Ishmael 56
  • The Wandering Jew 57
  • Heliogabalus 59
  • The Silver Nail 60
  • Easter at Whitby 63
  • Sir Giles in Springtime 65
  • Under the Clover 66
  • Persephone 68
  • Tartary 70
  • Willow-Shade 71
  • Fiddler's Green 74
  • Quiet Sleeping 75
  • Being Born 76
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